Carry The One Radio: The Science Podcast

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Synopsis

Carry the One Radio - Igniting Scientific Curiosity--Follow us @CTORadio--To support the show: www.patreon.com/carrytheone. --More science and podcast fun on our website: http://www.ctoradio.org

Episodes

  • Young Scientist Spotlight 4: Jhia Jackson

    Young Scientist Spotlight 4: Jhia Jackson

    18/05/2020 Duration: 35min

    For this fourth installment of “The Spotlight” we interviewed Jhia Jackson, who is a sociology PhD candidate at UCSF. We discussed her educational journey, current research on pediatric palliative and hospice care, her career as a professional dancer, being black at UCSF, cats, and ways to stay sane in grad school. This episode was written and produced by Stella Belonwu. Music from this episode was acquired from www.freesound.org. Music included in this episode: Dinglebells by evanjones4, Game background Music loop short by yummie, Invisible world - electronic music loop by frankum, more Jazz guitar.wav by Sub-d, and "Chorus music - Techno loop" by frankum.

  • God, Coal, and Fossils: The Story of the First Dinosaur

    God, Coal, and Fossils: The Story of the First Dinosaur

    04/05/2020 Duration: 29min

    We pretty much all accept the idea that dinosaurs once roamed the earth, but this wasn’t always the case. A few centuries ago, nobody believed animals could even go extinct. It would take huge societal upheaval and a few very determined oddballs to change people’s minds. In this episode, we follow the eccentric geologists and fossil-hunters who uncovered the first dinosaur, with author Ian Lendler as our guide. This episode was written and produced by Arja Ray, Ben Mansky, and Nancy Cai. Ian’s book, The First Dinosaur: How Science Solved the Greatest Mystery on Earth, is available wherever books are sold.

  • Beleaf What You Wanna Beleaf

    Beleaf What You Wanna Beleaf

    20/04/2020 Duration: 45min

    In this episode, we’re getting into the weeds of cannabis research. Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug in the world, but there is still so much we do not know about it.. To learn more, we spoke to two cannabis researchers: Dr. Steven Laviolette, a neurobiologist at The University of Western Ontario in London, Canada, and Dr. Salomeh Keyhani, a general internist and a health services researcher at UCSF’s Veteran Affairs Medical Center. From our conversation with Steven, we got insight into his lab’s findings on THC and CBD as they relate to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, his approaches to use these cannabis constituents to combat these disorders, the funding landscape of cannabis research, the Canadian cannabis industry, and his thoughts on the future of cannabis research. In our interview with Salomeh, we learned about her motivation to study cannabis, as well as her approaches to understand things ranging from its public perception to cardiovascular health effects. This episode was w

  • Shark Tales

    Shark Tales

    13/04/2020 Duration: 37min

    It’s a tale (or tail?) as old as time. Sharks have been around for at least 400 million years - proof of their resilience, but there’s still so much to learn about these majestic creatures. From their social dynamics to the different kinds of shark-tracking devices currently in use, we spoke to Michelle Jewell, the Chief Science Communicator in the Department of Applied Ecology at NC State University. In this episode, she shared personal stories from her graduate school days as a white shark researcher in South Africa to what she does today as a science communicator for a university. This episode was written and produced by Devika Nair and Li Wang with editing help from the rest of the CTOR team. Music used in this episode: Tiny Putty, Game Hens, Hundred Mile, Bundt, Borough, Slow Lane Lover, Front Runner, Calm and Collected, Beignet, and Tar and Spackle by Blue Dot Sessions. Sound effects from FreeMusicArchive. Cover Image courtesy of Michelle Jewell. For more information on Michelle’s work, please visit

  • Women in Science: Dr. Marina Sirota

    Women in Science: Dr. Marina Sirota

    06/04/2020 Duration: 29min

    Welcome to Women in Science, a special series in honor of Women’s History Month. Join us each Monday in March as we hear from women making great strides in their fields, from reproductive health justice to animal evolution. We’ll learn about the challenges they’ve faced in their journeys, explore the importance of representation, and see how women on the forefront of science and medicine lift up others and build toward a better tomorrow. In the fifth and final episode of this series, we’re featuring Dr. Marina Sirota, an assistant professor at the Bakar Computational Health Sciences Institute at UCSF. We talk about how one can use troves of data to make important medical discoveries– but also about the challenges of leveraging so much information. Among other things, we also discuss the rewards of introducing young girls to the beauty of data science, and what it’s like to transition between industry and academia.

  • Women in Science: Dr. Flora Rutaganira

    Women in Science: Dr. Flora Rutaganira

    30/03/2020 Duration: 28min

    Welcome to Women in Science, a special series in honor of Women’s History Month. Join us each Monday in March (and April - thanks, COVID-19!) as we hear from women making great strides in their fields, from reproductive health justice to animal evolution. We’ll learn about the challenges they’ve faced in their journeys, explore the importance of representation, and see how women on the forefront of science and medicine lift up others and build toward a better tomorrow. In the fourth episode of this series, we’re featuring Dr. Flora Rutaganira, a postdoctoral researcher in Dr. Nicole King’s lab at UC Berkeley. In our conversation, we talk about the beauty (and cuteness!) of choanoflagellates, finding community and direction as an early-career researcher, and how universities can support marginalized scientists.

  • Women in Science: Dr. Meryl Horn

    Women in Science: Dr. Meryl Horn

    23/03/2020 Duration: 29min

    Welcome to Women in Science, a special series in honor of Women’s History Month. Join us each Monday in March as we hear from women making great strides in their fields, from reproductive health justice to animal evolution. We’ll learn about the challenges they’ve faced in their journeys, explore the importance of representation, and see how women on the forefront of science and medicine lift up others and build toward a better tomorrow. In the third episode of this series, we’re featuring Dr. Meryl Horn, a former president of Carry the One Radio and a current producer of the podcast Science Vs. We discuss her journey as a scientist, her passion for researching the scientific issues that really matter to the public, and her search for answers when the scientific topic is under-researched and unclear.

  • Women in Science: Dr. Ramona Tascoe

    Women in Science: Dr. Ramona Tascoe

    09/03/2020 Duration: 53min

    Welcome to Women in Science, a special series in honor of Women's History Month. Join us each Monday in March as we hear from women making great strides in their fields, from reproductive health justice to animal evolution. We’ll learn about the challenges they’ve faced in their journeys, explore the importance of representation, and see how women on the forefront of science and medicine lift up others and build toward a better tomorrow. In the second episode of this series, we're featuring Dr. Ramona Tascoe, a physician and activist whose work has left impacts in the Bay Area and internationally. In our conversation, we talked about the strengths of Dr. Tascoe’s unconventional academic background, her experiences with racism and sexual harassment in medical school and residency, and how cultural competency can heal communities and improve health outcomes.

  • Women in Science: Dr. Monica McLemore

    Women in Science: Dr. Monica McLemore

    02/03/2020 Duration: 25min

    Welcome to Women in Science, a special series in honor of Women's History Month. Join us each Monday in March as we hear from women making great strides in their fields, from reproductive health justice to animal evolution. We’ll learn about the challenges they’ve faced in their journeys, explore the importance of representation, and see how women on the forefront of science and medicine lift up others and build toward a better tomorrow. In the first episode of this series, we're featuring Dr. Monica McLemore, a professor at UCSF who researches reproductive health and rights. We discuss her journey through nursing and public health, the power of social media, and the ethical need to get the community involved in the research process.

  • Young Scientist Spotlight 3: Dr. Armen Moughamian

    Young Scientist Spotlight 3: Dr. Armen Moughamian

    17/02/2020 Duration: 22min

    Welcome to our third installment of “The Spotlight”! In this episode, we interviewed Dr. Armen Moughamiam, who is a neurology fellow at UCSF and an ambassador to both science and medicine. We discuss the educational journey of an MD/PhD, experiencing “unknown unknowns”, and staying motivated in this long (but rewarding!) path. Music in this episode: Borough by Blue Dot Sessions Special thanks to Veronica Oberholzer and Kanchi Mehta for your first listens. Music: Borough by Blue Dot Sessions

  • Totally Microtubular

    Totally Microtubular

    03/02/2020 Duration: 24min

    A cell constantly interacts and adapts to its environment, making seemingly smart choices. But how can a single cell, without a centralized control center, solve such complex problems? Is there simple physics behind the complex measurement and feedback that goes on inside cells? In this episode, we speak to Dr. Wallace Marshall, Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at UCSF, about his work to determine how cells measure and regulate optimal size. In the process, we discuss diffusion, molecular motors, the cell’s ever-changing skeletons, and the idea of a software to engineer cells in the future. This episode was written and produced by Arja Ray, Devika Nair, and Katie Cabral with editing help from the rest of the Carry the One Radio team. Music used in this episode includes Partly Sage, Denzel Sprak, Hundred Mile, Tiny Putty, Highway 94, Guild Rat, Game Hens, The Zeppelin, Beignet, Balti, Loopy, Dorica, and Dance of Felt by Blue Dot Sessions. Cover Image by Yuri Korchmar. Check out this animation of a

  • Once Upon an Arc

    Once Upon an Arc

    21/01/2020 Duration: 25min

    In this episode, we’re turning back the clock to our earliest days - just after birth. What happens to our brains in this sensitive time of life? More than we ever thought, it turns out. We spoke with Dr. Mercedes Paredes, assistant professor of neurology at UCSF, to learn more about how humans’ brain cells are still moving and changing even after we’re born. As we learn more about the brain’s initial stages, we can better understand its vulnerabilities. Not only that, but we can also figure out how to intervene early on to stave off neurological problems like psychiatric illness or epilepsy. This episode was written and produced by Stella Belonwu, Rebecca Fang, Deanna Necula, and Ben Mansky. Music in this episode includes “A Day at the Park,” “Fomalhaut,” and “Convergence” by Pictures of the Floating World and “Autowaschanlage Instrumental” by Lobo Loco. For more on recent developments with the HHS Fetal Tissue Ethics Review Board, see www.washingtonpost.com/health/trump-…aa_story.html.

  • Young Scientist Spotlight 2: Dr. Rachel Care

    Young Scientist Spotlight 2: Dr. Rachel Care

    06/01/2020 Duration: 22min

    For this second installment of “The Spotlight” we spoke to Dr. Rachel Care, a newly minted PhD who studies how the retina adapts to losing vision. We talked about her path to research, the changing landscape of graduate education, and night vision goggles. Music in this episode: Thought Bubbles, Thinking It Over, Bigger Questions, Decompress, and Where Was I by Lee Rosevere

  • Results: A Map to Target HIV

    Results: A Map to Target HIV

    03/12/2019 Duration: 23min

    Dr. David Gordon studies HIV. In Life/Science, a mini-series produced in collaboration with the UCSF Quantitative Biosciences Institute, we're giving you a peek behind the curtain. This isn't just a series about science, it's also about the process, about what it actually means to do this kind of research - including the confusion, failures, and triumphs David has faced along the way. In the final episode of Life/Science, we reveal what David found in his gigantic experiment, and how his findings might lead to new avenues for HIV treatment. We also break down the process of how a scientific finding makes it from the lab to the world at large. If you like what you hear, give us a like or leave a comment! We'd love to hear from you. Music featured in this episode comes from Podington Bear and Blue Dot Sessions. Other contributors to David's research include Ariane Watson, Assen Roguev, and Nevan Krogan. This episode was written and produced by Ben Mansky and Elina Kostyanovskaya, with help from Katie Cabral.

  • Methods: Of Cells and Robots

    Methods: Of Cells and Robots

    18/11/2019 Duration: 20min

    Dr. David Gordon studies HIV. In Life/Science, a mini-series produced in collaboration with the UCSF Quantitative Biosciences Institute, we're giving you a peek behind the curtain. This isn't just a series about science, it's also about the process, about what it actually means to do this kind of research - including the confusion, failures, and triumphs David has faced along the way. Life/Science will be updated bi-weekly, so make sure to tune in on December 2nd for Episode 3: Results! Next time, we’ll hear what David’s experiment revealed, and its implications for the world at large. If you like what you hear, give us a like or leave a comment! We'd love to hear from you. Music featured in this episode comes from Podington Bear and Blue Dot Sessions. Other contributors to David's research include Ariane Watson, Stefanie Jager, and Assen Roguev. This episode was written and produced by Katie Cabral, Ben Mansky, and Elina Kostyanovskaya. Support for Life/Science comes from the Quantitative Biosciences Insti

  • Shedding Light on Dark Matter

    Shedding Light on Dark Matter

    12/11/2019 Duration: 39min

    When you close your eyes and imagine the universe, what do you see? Maybe you picture billions of swirling galaxies made of dust, gas, stars, and planets. But, what if we told you that the major source of mass in the universe is made out of something we cannot see? Not only can we not see it, we aren’t even entirely sure what it is. This mysterious cosmic substance is called dark matter, and it is the subject of this episode. To learn about dark matter, we spoke to Dr. Neta Bahcall, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Astrophysics at Princeton University. We discuss how it was discovered, as well as how astrophysicists are certain it exists, but are still frustrated by the elusive nature of the particles that make up dark matter. We also discuss some of the work currently being done to better understand what dark matter is, how it’s distributed in the universe, and what effect it has on the structure and evolution of the universe. This episode was written & produced by Stella Belonwu, Anna Lipkin, Cindy Liu an

  • Introduction: The Battle Against Viruses (re-run)

    Introduction: The Battle Against Viruses (re-run)

    04/11/2019 Duration: 20min

    Dr. David Gordon studies HIV. In Life/Science, a new mini-series produced in collaboration with the UCSF Quantitative Biosciences Institute, we're giving you a peek behind the curtain. This isn't just a series about science, it's also about the process, about what it actually means to do this kind of research - including the confusion, failures, and triumphs David has faced along the way. Life/Science will be updated bi-weekly, so make sure to tune in on the 18th for Episode 2: Methods! We'll take a deep dive into the experiments David used to figure out how HIV hijacks human cells for its own nefarious purposes. If you like what you hear, give us a like or leave a comment! We'd love to hear from you. Music featured in this episode comes from Podington Bear. Other contributors to David's research include Ariane Watson, Stefanie Jager, and Assen Roguev.

  • Young Scientist Spotlight 1: Witney Chen

    Young Scientist Spotlight 1: Witney Chen

    22/10/2019 Duration: 16min

    We’re proud to present the first episode in our brand new Young Scientist Spotlight Series, or “The Spotlight” for short. Each month, we’ll feature an informal, lightly-edited interview with a graduate student, postdoc, staff researcher, or other early-career scientist. Through these conversations, we’ll be bringing you a fun, down-to-earth look at not only even more of the awesome science content you love, but also the people behind the science. In our first Spotlight, we spoke with Witney Chen, a graduate student studying Parkinson’s Disease at the University of California, San Francisco. We chatted about her research on brain stimulation in human patients, life in graduate school, how she became a scientist, and… dog poop. This episode was produced by Ben Mansky. Music is “Borough,” from Blue Dot Sessions.

  • Making Sense of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    Making Sense of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    14/10/2019 Duration: 29min

    How does a potential drug discovered in the lab ultimately end up in people? We tackle this question in the context of exciting gene-modifying therapies called antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). In this episode, we speak with Dr. Tim Miller to break down the science behind ASOs and learn more about his work in finding a cure for a genetic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This episode was written and produced by Nancy Cai, Devika Nair, and Arja Ray. Music used in this episode: “Thannoid”, “Bundt”, “Lupi”, “Partly Sage”, “Beignet”, “Trailrunner”, “Game Hens”, “Lord Weasel”, “The Zeppelin”, “Dorica”, “Our Fingers Cold”, “Gaena” by Blue Dot Sessions For more information about spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), check out the spinal muscular dystrophy association website: https://www.mda.org/disease/spinal-muscular-atrophy. There is also this great animation that shows how the Spinraza (nusinersen) ASO works in the body: https://www.spinraza.com/en_us/home/taking/how-spinraza-works.html. To read th

  • The Mosquito Menace

    The Mosquito Menace

    19/09/2019 Duration: 39min

    Did you know that mosquitoes kill over 700,000 people a year? They are the most dangerous animal in the world. How can they be stopped?! In this episode, we spoke with a variety of experts that are working on mosquito vector control in the Caribbean and Latin America. The common theme is that it is essential to educate community members about the risks of mosquitoes and actions that they can take to reduce mosquito breeding. An educated community is much more engaged to take actions to prevent mosquito borne diseases like Zika and dengue. We also spoke to the World Mosquito Program about their research on infecting mosquitoes with a harmless bacteria called Wolbachia that prevents the mosquitoes from being able to spread disease. Although progress is being made, it will take a lot of money, resources, and new technology to eliminate the spread of mosquito-borne diseases. You can check out the USAID Zika photo exhibit, which featured clips from some of the interviews in this episode, at https://spark.adobe.

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